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Simple tips to fight inflammation

We are finding out more about how inflammation plays a significant role in the development of chronic diseases such as diabetes.

 

Inflammation is part of the complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants, and is a protective response involving immune cells, blood vessels, and molecular mediators.

 

The function of inflammation is to eliminate the initial cause of cell injury, clear out necrotic cells and tissues damaged from the original insult and the inflammatory process, and initiate tissue repair.

 

The awareness of the intersection between inflammation and chronic disease has spawned a plethora of diet plans, nutritional supplements, and lifestyle programs, many implying they offer new ways to improve your health by quelling inflammation.

 

While it is true that scientists are uncovering new complexities and expanding their knowledge of factors that may contribute to inflammation or help counter it, there's nothing new about inflammation itself.

 

Likewise, much of the heavily hyped guidance for an anti-inflammation lifestyle boils down to the same no-nonsense health advice your grandmother might have given you.

Our diets play an important role in chronic inflammation because our digestive bacteria release chemicals that may spur or suppress inflammation.

 

The types of bacteria that populate our gut and their chemical byproducts vary according to the foods we eat. Some foods encourage the growth of populations of bacteria that stimulate inflammation, while others promote the growth of bacteria that suppress it.

 

Fortunately, you are probably already enjoying many of the foods and drinks that have been linked to reductions in inflammation.

 

They include the following:

 

  • Fruits and vegetables. Most fruits and brightly coloured vegetables naturally contain high levels of antioxidants and polyphenols, potentially protective compounds found in plants.
  • Nuts and seeds. Studies have found that consuming nuts and seeds is associated with reduced markers of inflammation and a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.
  • Beverages. The polyphenols in coffee and the flavonols in cocoa are thought to have anti-inflammatory properties. Green tea is also rich in both polyphenols and antioxidants. 

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